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Why are my Teeth sensitive to Cold?


why do i have sensitive teeth? what causes sensitive teeth? why are my teeth sensitive to water?

Do you ever have any tooth pain when drinking an ice-cold beverage? Maybe when taking a sip of your favorite hot soup? Perhaps you get a sharp pain when your Dental Hygienist is cleaning around your teeth? Although it may be normal to get some tooth sensitivity in response to extreme cold or hot temperatures, having tooth pain that is triggered by temperatures that aren't too extreme or the simple touch of a metal could be a sign tooth hypersensitivity, but why do we get this thrilling sharp pain?


Why do I have sensitive teeth?

From our experience, we have noticed that most cases of tooth sensitivity are a result of gum recession. Gum recession is when the gum tissue that covers the roots of our teeth begins to pull away from the tooth, exposing the root. The root of the tooth doesn't have any enamel (the white protective layer of the tooth) so when it's exposed it allows the cold or hot temperatures to reach the pulp (where the nerve is located) of the tooth, triggering a pain response.

Most of this recession is either caused by brushing too aggressively, brushing with a hard toothbrush or even using your electric toothbrush incorrectly. So if you haven't already, start using a soft bristle toothbrush and don't brush too hard to prevent this from happening to you in the future!

Another reason why tooth hypersensitivity can begin to occur is due to the loss of tooth enamel. This may also be a result (and a combination of) of brushing too hard, with a hard bristle toothbrush or using an electric toothbrush incorrectly, but there are a few other reasons why this important protective layer may be lost. These are:

  • Drinking acidic beverages such as Soda, Lemonade, Orange juice and even coffee... The acidic environment in your mouth created by these drinks will slowly, but surely begin to remove more and more enamel.

  • Acid Reflux, and GERD. For the same reason as above, the stomach's acid will begin to break down the enamel layer.

  • Grinding and/or Clenching your teeth. Doing this will wear out the enamel layer from the chewing surfaces and the "neck" of the tooth respectively.

As we begin to lose more and more enamel, this layer keeps getting thinner and thinner. The thinner this layer is, the closer the nerve is to the outside environment of the mouth. So when you drink something hot or hot the temperature will reach the the inner pulp much easier and faster.

It is important to know that as a result of genetics, some of us may naturally have a thinner layer of enamel than others. This means that we are more prone to get sensitive teeth.


Thank you for taking the time to read this blog post. We hope this product helps you understand why you may be having sensitive teeth. If you have any questions please leave them in the comment section below. If you enjoyed and found it educational please share it with your friends and family on Facebook and follow us on Instagram. It only takes 1 minute of your time and it helps us out a lot. Thanks


Resources:

http://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Science%20and%20Research/Files/patient_33.ashx

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/ss/slideshow-sensitive-teeth-causes

https://startsmiling.com/blog/acid-reflux--protecting-your-teeth-from-acid-reflux#:~:text=Research%20shows%20that%20enamel%20erodes,reflux%20from%20damaging%20your%20teeth.